What is hospice?

Many people wonder: “What is hospice, anyway?”

By definition, hospice is end-of-life care. To us, it’s far more than that. It’s living in faith, finding peace and making precious memories. Hospice is being informed, understood and respected. It’s spending what time is left on your own terms, where and how you choose — comfortable and with confidence and dignity. It’s a gentle, loving and experienced care team that joins your family for the entire journey, never more than a phone call away. And when grief and loss set in, hospice is still there to help loved ones begin the healing process.

“Seeing death as the end of life is like seeing the horizon as the end of the ocean.”

-David Searls, Author

You can receive hospice services in your own home or wherever you live (with a family member, in a nursing home or assisted living facility, or even in the hospital). Where and how you choose to live out your days is entirely up to you.

Benefits of hospice care:

  • Reduced pain and discomfort
  • Better quality of life
  • Assistance with personal care, such as hygiene and grooming
  • Coordinated clinical oversight
  • Greater control over your care and personal affairs
  • More confidence and less stress
  • Understanding what to expect
  • Security in knowing that a hospice nurse is available every day 24/7
  • Emotional and spiritual support for you and your family

“Your help and knowledge was invaluable to us in this time of uncertainty. Regardless of how many “episodes” Mom experienced, each one was scary for our family. Having Gentle Shepherd to call upon was so very reassuring. We can’t thank you enough for always being there with comfort and excellent advice.”

Kathy G.
Roanoke, VA

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